Workshops

Important: We are not planning to have an additional charge for attending workshops because we believe these topics play an important role in community-building.

Introduction to Epistemic Network Analysis

Kamila Misiejuk and Brendan Eagan

This workshop introduces the participants to the basics of the Epistemic Network Analysis (ENA) by analyzing two Shakespeare plays: Romeo and Juliet, and Hamlet. The goal of the workshop is to learn how to use the ENA web tool independently, and how to develop and interpret ENA graphs. The workshop consists of three parts: 1) theory, 2) step-by-step tutorial, and 3) group work. The topics of the first part are the differences between social network analysis and ENA, and data coding challenges. In the second part, the participants are introduced to the ENA web tool in order to compare the discourse between Romeo and Juliet, and Hamlet. Finally, the participants put their newly acquired skills into practice in the group work exercises.


Introduction to Automated Coding and nCoder

Amanda Siebert-Evenstone and Seung Bok Lee

This workshop will introduce methods for valid and reliable automated coding of text data using the nCoder webtool and R package. During the workshop, participants will work individually and in teams to step through the process of creating an automated and validated code. In this interactive workshop, participants will learn how to (1) combine qualitative and quantitative perspectives for text analysis, (2) create codebooks for code validation and publication, (3) develop and test automated classifiers to code text data, and (4) validate automated coding schemes. We will also provide an R script for participants who wish to use the R package version of this technique.


Advanced Epistemic Network Analysis

Zach Swiecki and Cody Marquart

In this workshop, we will introduce participants to advanced features of epistemic network analysis (ENA) available in the webtool and the rENA package for R, including weighted models, projection, masking, and trajectories. Participants will work in groups to apply these features on one of several sample datasets. Our emphasis will be on how to implement the features, as well as how to determine whether they should be used. The workshop will culminate with an rENA analysis using ENA outputs in a subsequent technique, such as regression. Familiarity with ENA theory, the webtool, and rENA is preferred; however, we will provide brief overviews of each. We will also provide an R script for participants to use as a reference during and after the workshop.